Mystery of the Universe
vintagerosebrocante:

my source Romantiska Hem

alltheprettydresses:

From the seller:

This 1840’s hand quilted petticoat is a work of art. Not only is the quilting done in lovely patterns but the border on the bottom is totally edged in hand knitted lace. The length around the bottom is 83 inches. The waist of the garment is 33 inches. I believe the waist band has been replaced, though someone did a good job. I think the waist was smaller with deeper pleating originally. The length of the skirt is 36 inches. This quilted petticoat makes a dramatic statement and is museum worthy. The condition is good to excellent. There are no holes or stains that I see. This skirt has a double interest as a textile because of the fashion statement that it makes and because of the exquisite hand quilting.

genderific:

Brassiere, 1912-1913. 
Now that corsets had largely gone out of fashion, women needed something else to support the bust—such as this early bra.  It fastens in the back with a ribbon: 

genderific:

Brassiere, 1912-1913. 

Now that corsets had largely gone out of fashion, women needed something else to support the bust—such as this early bra.  It fastens in the back with a ribbon: 

cheriskeepsakebox:

   Vintage linen, from my private collection.
   Which consists of the two things above (a nineteenth century lace cotton christening gown and an eighteenth century French hemp sleep shirt) and a big pile of fabric from the thrift stores strewn about my Crap Craft Room. Yep, it is pretty impressive, my private collection.

cheriskeepsakebox:

   Vintage linen, from my private collection.

   Which consists of the two things above (a nineteenth century lace cotton christening gown and an eighteenth century French hemp sleep shirt) and a big pile of fabric from the thrift stores strewn about my Crap Craft Room. Yep, it is pretty impressive, my private collection.

ornamentedbeing:

This is an example of Empire chemise chemise worn by Empress Joséphine with scoop neckline and lace-fringed hem.
Josephine’s chemise, cambric embroidery, lace (Châteaux de Malmaison et Bois-Préau, Malmaison France)

ornamentedbeing:

This is an example of Empire chemise chemise worn by Empress Joséphine with scoop neckline and lace-fringed hem.

Josephine’s chemise, cambric embroidery, lace (Châteaux de Malmaison et Bois-Préau, Malmaison France)

yeoldefashion:

A fad for black and white stripes emerged right around the turn of the century which is when this gorgeous silk petticoat dates from.

yeoldefashion:

A fad for black and white stripes emerged right around the turn of the century which is when this gorgeous silk petticoat dates from.

quieter:
walking-couture:
Lace and sheer fabrics are so versatile.

quieter:

walking-couture:

Lace and sheer fabrics are so versatile.

morbidfashion:

historicalfashion:

Woman’s fetish corset and boots, LACMA, c. 1900
(above photo by me, all below from LACMA)




WANT.

morbidfashion:

historicalfashion:

Woman’s fetish corset and boots, LACMA, c. 1900

(above photo by me, all below from LACMA)

WANT.

alltheprettydresses:

From the seller:

For your consideration, a rare matching set Civil War Wedding/Ball gown underdress from c.1860’s.

It is recently de-accessioned from the Brookyln costume collection.

This two piece dress is made of matching fine white cotton.

The dropped-shoulder bodice has low evening (ball gown) neckline with small fancy scallop sleeves done in Aryshire style(see pic).

The neckline is decorated with cotton lace edged with hand crochet borders.

The bodice closes at the back with original Brass hook/eye closures.

The bodice is cut in “V” shape which are typical of the era.

The simple yet elegant skirt has long graceful train in the back.

It has large double flounce at the bottom edged with large floral lace(see pic).

The skirt elegantly flares from the waist & can accmmodate a large crinoline.

It closes in the back with matching brass hook/eye.

This set is a rare complete find & show what Civil War ladies would wear underneath their fancy ball gowns.

The bodice measures 19 1/2” across shoulders, 31” bust, 4” sleeves 22” waist & the skirt is 22” waist, 39” front, 53” back length & 125” hem.

In most presentable condition with a couple of tiny holes & missing hooks/eyes in the back(near opening) & a few tiny brown marks on the skirt(hardly noticeable).

Otherwise a fine example of a rare original Civil War garment in wonderful design & pattern!

oldrags:

Magazine cover?  Spread?, 1910, Royal Blue Book of Correct Corset Styles 1910

oldrags:

Magazine cover?  Spread?, 1910, Royal Blue Book of Correct Corset Styles 1910

ornamentedbeing:

Cage Crinoline (1860) made of wool and cotton with a spring-steel frameCollection of the Victoria and Albert Museum 
“The cage crinoline was adopted with enthusiasm: the numerous petticoats, even the stiffened or hooped ones, were heavy, bulky and generally uncomfortable. It was light — it only required one or two petticoats worn over the top to prevent the steel bands appearing as ridges in the skirt — and freed the wearer’s legs from tangling petticoats.”

ornamentedbeing:

Cage Crinoline (1860) made of wool and cotton with a spring-steel frame
Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum 

The cage crinoline was adopted with enthusiasm: the numerous petticoats, even the stiffened or hooped ones, were heavy, bulky and generally uncomfortable. It was light — it only required one or two petticoats worn over the top to prevent the steel bands appearing as ridges in the skirt — and freed the wearer’s legs from tangling petticoats.”

ornamentedbeing:

Speaking of Crinolines I adore this cartoon!
The third one on the top is my FAVORITE! 

ornamentedbeing:

Speaking of Crinolines I adore this cartoon!

The third one on the top is my FAVORITE!